Untitled Document Home
Chef & Hotel Profile
Publisher's Page
Gift Guide
Travel Adventures
Epicurean Events
Health Minded
Spa Baby Secrets
Sips
Book Bites
Culinary Coup
Sense of Style
Kids Kaleidoscope
Tinsletown Tidbits
Wheels
Radio Show & Links
Contact Us


HEALTH MINDED . . .

DEBBIE DURKIN DOES IT AGAIN AT SUNDANCE 2015

Eco-Friendly Lounge a Welcome Respite for Celebs

Celebrity gifting guruess Debbie Durkin is well known for her glitz filled eco-friendly lounges for celebs. The Suncance Eco Lounge 2015 was no exception. Held at Cisero's Bar on zpark City's zmain Street, it attracted stars such as Breaking Bad actor RJ Mitte, Golden Globe-winning actress Gina Rodriguez, and former Real Housewives of Orange County star Gretchen Rossie who indulged in the scrumptious breakfast foods bar, Tito's Vodka Bloody Marys were enjoyed by celebs, and fantastic travel, fashion, and beauty gifts!

The stylish pakems packable shoes were a huge hit with all the celebs. These adorable and fashion-forward light dhoes travel well and are ideal for every activity. After a hard day touring these pakems offer a slip on shoe to renew your feet for yet another day of action. Debbie Durkin's celebrity gifting suite offered luxe vacations to the attending Hollywood stars. Big-name guests received a stay at the Moon Palace Golf & Spa Resort in Cancun, courtesy of Caribbean Living Magazine, who also provided copies of their latest glossy to visitors. Additional sponsors included the Earth-friendly "I Love Independent Films" gift bags by Cafe Press, a fantastic coffee bar by Repurpose Compostables, tasty fruit and nut oatmeal by Modern Oats, and a gift card and all-natural cosmetic sponges by J.Andre.

The 2015 Sundance EcoLuxeLounge was highly enjoyable and confirms why Debbie Durkin is Hollywood's leader in sustainable celebrity product placement. If Sundance 2016 is on your agenda, don't miss Durkin's EcoLuxeLounge. This suite needs to be at the top of your to do list for next year!

Durkin Oscar EcoLuxeLounge February 21 Beverly Hilton, Beverly Hills

 

Welcome Chef -1st hybrid Executive Chef + Nutrition Expert healing with Food at Oscar EcoLuxeLounge.

Report by Bonnie Carroll

___________________________________________________________________

EarthTalk®
E - The Environmental Magazine

Dear EarthTalk: How is it that antibiotics are being “overused,” as I’ve read, and what are the potential consequences? -- Mitchell Chase, Hartford, CT

The development and widespread adoption of so-called “antibiotics”—drugs that kill bacteria and thereby reduce infection—has helped billions of people live longer, healthier lives. But all this tinkering with nature hasn’t come without a cost. The more we rely on antibiotics, the more bacteria develop resistance to them, which makes treating infections that much more challenging.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), overuse of antibiotics by humans—such as for the mistreatment of viral infections—means these important drugs are less effective for all of us. Besides the toll on our health, researchers estimate that antibiotic resistance causes Americans upwards of $20 billion in additional healthcare costs every year stemming from the treatment of otherwise preventable infections.

A bigger issue, though, is our growing reliance on feeding antibiotics to livestock for growth promotion, weight gain and to treat, control and prevent disease. This increasingly common practice is a significant factor in the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, which the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) acknowledges can get passed onto humans who eat food from treated animals. The non-profit Environmental Working Group (EWG) reports that the majority of the ground beef and ground turkey sold in the typical American grocery store contains antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

Last year, 26 animal pharmaceutical companies voluntarily complied with an FDA request to re-label medically important antibiotics used in food-producing animals to warn against using them for growth promotion and weight gain. FDA also recommended that medically important antibiotics be prescribed by licensed veterinarians and only to treat, control and prevent disease. “We need to be selective about the drugs we use in animals and when we use them,” says William Flynn of the FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine. “Antimicrobial resistance may not be completely preventable, but we need to do what we can to slow it down.”

Still some worry that the FDA’s action doesn’t go far enough, given that farmers will still be able to administer antibiotics to their livestock for disease prevention. The fact that more and more livestock operations are switching over to Animal Feeding Operations (AFOs) whereby animals are confined in crowded enclosures (instead of allowed to graze at pasture) means that antibiotics will play an increasingly important role in disease prevention.

For its part, the FDA argues that since veterinarians need to authorize antibiotic use for disease prevention, farmers and ranchers are less likely to overuse antibiotics for their livestock populations. The same can be said about doctors’ limiting the prescription of antibiotics for their human patients, but only time will tell whether such newfound restraint is enough in the fast evolving arms race between bacteria and our antibiotics.

Of course, consumers can do their part by avoiding antibiotic medications unless absolutely necessary and eating less meat (or giving it up entirely) to help reduce demand.

CONTACTS: CDC, www.cdc.gov; EWG, www.ewg.org; FDA Center for Veterinary Medicine, www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary.

EarthTalk® is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E - The Environmental Magazine (www.emagazine.com). Send questions to: earthtalk@emagazine.com.


2008
March 08 | April 08 | May 08 | June 08 | July 08 | July 080 | September 08 | October 08 | November 08 | December 08 | January 09 | February 09 | March 09 | April 09 | May 09 | June 09 | July 09 | August 09 | September 09 | October 09 | November 09 | December 09 | January 10 | February 10 | March 10 | April 10 | May 10 | June 10 | July 10 | August 10 | September 10 | October 10 | November 10 | December 10 | January 11 | February 11 | March 11 | April 11 | May 11 | June 11 | July 11 | August 11 | September 11 | October 11 | November 11 | December 11 | January 12 | February 12 | March 12 | April 12 | May 12 | June 12 | June | July 12 | August 12 | September 12 | October 12 | November 12 | December 12 | January 13 | February 13 | March 13 | April 13 | May 13 | June 13 | July 13 | August 13 | September 13 | October 13 | November 13 | December 13 | December | January 14 | February 14 | March 14 | April 14 | May 14 | June 14 | July 14 | August 14 | September 14 | October 14 | December 14 | November 14 | January 15 | February 15 | March 15 | April 15 | May 15 | July 15 | June 15 | August 15 | September 15 | October 15 | November 15 | December 15 | January 16 | February 16 | March 16 | April 16 | May 16 | August 16 | September 16 | June 16 | July 16 | October 16 | November 16 | December 16 | January 17 | February 17 | March 17 | April 17 | May 17 | June 17 | July 17 | August 17 | February 08 | January 08

2007
December 07
| November 07 | October 07 | September 07 | August 07 | July 07 | June 07 | May 07
April 07 | March 07 | February 07 | January 07

2006
December 06
| November 06 | October 06 | September 06 | August 06 | July 06 | June 06 | May 06
April 06 | March 06 | February 06 | January 06

2005
December 05
| November 05 | October 05 | September 05 | August 05 | July 05 | June 05 | May 05
April 05
| March 05 | February 05 | January 05

© 2008 Bonnie Carroll, All Rights Reserved